"In terms of the impact of historical defeats, it’s worth noting that in the wake of the 1848 revolutions Marx’s emphasis on changing the world and not just interpreting it underwent a reversal. Marx was too optimistic about the potential of 1848, and those disappointments led him to return to the importance of understanding the world as a condition for changing it. This search for a historical materialist understanding dominated the rest of his life. In light of our own defeats, it is likewise crucial for us to learn more deeply about the nature of the world we confront…”

quentintortellini:

History Parallels
1st image: 1967 Newark Riots
2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots
4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
quentintortellini:

History Parallels
1st image: 1967 Newark Riots
2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots
4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
quentintortellini:

History Parallels
1st image: 1967 Newark Riots
2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots
4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
quentintortellini:

History Parallels
1st image: 1967 Newark Riots
2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests
3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots
4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

quentintortellini:

History Parallels

1st image: 1967 Newark Riots

2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots

4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

theparisreview:

James Wolcott on the scourge of nineties nostalgia: “Mostly a white people’s pastime, nostalgia used to be a pining for an idealized yesteryear, for a prelapsarian world tinted in sepia … the Internet and cable TV have colonized the hive mind and set up carnival pavilions. Now every delight is obtainable and on display at an arcade that never closes … This anxious, ravenous speedup of nostalgia—getting wistful over goodies that never went away—is more than a reflection of the overall acceleration of digital culture, a pathetic sign of our determination to dote on every last shiny souvenir of our prolonged adolescence, and an indictment of our gutless refusal to face the rotten future like Stoic philosophers.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

James Wolcott on the scourge of nineties nostalgia: “Mostly a white people’s pastime, nostalgia used to be a pining for an idealized yesteryear, for a prelapsarian world tinted in sepia … the Internet and cable TV have colonized the hive mind and set up carnival pavilions. Now every delight is obtainable and on display at an arcade that never closes … This anxious, ravenous speedup of nostalgia—getting wistful over goodies that never went away—is more than a reflection of the overall acceleration of digital culture, a pathetic sign of our determination to dote on every last shiny souvenir of our prolonged adolescence, and an indictment of our gutless refusal to face the rotten future like Stoic philosophers.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

ashtrayreel:

8½, Federico Fellini (1963)
ashtrayreel:

8½, Federico Fellini (1963)
ashtrayreel:

8½, Federico Fellini (1963)

ashtrayreel:

, Federico Fellini (1963)

theparisreview:

“Think about it: Have you ever seen a cat driving a cruiser? Have you even once seen a cat with a badge? These animals want Friskies, not frisking.”

Dan Piepenbring on black-and-white zine “Cats Hate Cops.”

  1. Camera: iPhone 5s
  2. Aperture: f/2.2
  3. Exposure: 1/2053th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).
magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).
magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).
magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).
magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).
magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).

magictransistor:

Rosarium Philosophorum (ca. 1550).

yusufbho:

Martin CreedWork No. 227  The lights going on and off  2000  5 seconds on / 5 seconds off  MOMA, New York, 2007
http://martincreed.com/site/works/work-no-227

yusufbho:

Martin Creed
Work No. 227 
The lights going on and off
2000 
5 seconds on / 5 seconds off
MOMA, New York, 2007

http://martincreed.com/site/works/work-no-227

(Source: camxvx)